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Orlando Weather

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image : (c) istock/thinkstock

Orlando is certainly not a cold and dismal place, given its huge entertainment and tourism industries. People visit Orlando and commercial developers build in Orlando because of its tropical climate. There is really only two practical seasons in the city: hot and rainy summer, which encompasses May and September as well, and the dry and cooler temperatures prevalent in the fall/spring time, specifically October through April. Even these cool temperatures are still a bit warm, usually averaging 60.2 °F (15.7 °C) in the coolest month of January. The winter season is typically not rainy, and freezing temperatures rarely occur. When they do, it’s usually after cold fronts pass. Snow does not occur very often. Summers are stingingly hot and humid, coming in at lower to mid 90s °F (32–36 °C) for most of the season, and usually never lower than 70 °F (21 °C). The good news is that temperatures over 100 °F (38 °C), are also rare because of the buffering humidity. Still, humidity does make the temperature feel much hotter than it actually is.

Thunderstorms are fairly common in the summer months, as air masses from the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean come together right around Central Florida. Hail and lightning are possible, leading to 1,290 mm of annual average rainfall. Hurricanes are a concern, even though thunderstorms happen far more often. However, Orlando is so far central that parks rarely close for hurricanes. Even if the parks close for damaging winds or hail, the resort usually goes out of its way to entertain families with Disney characters making appearances. In the worst case scenario, you can be content knowing that Disney hotels (and other pricey hotels in the surrounding area) are among the safest places you can be during inclement weather.

Tornadic thunderstorms are more of a threat during the winter season and in a hurricane, rather than rainy and humid summers. Historically February is the worst month for dangerous weather. The state of Florida is often called the “lightning capital of the western hemisphere” because of the frequency of summer thunderstorms. Ironically, and unique to Orlando’s unusual climate, sometimes one location stays completely dry while the other receives torrential rains and storms.

If you want to avoid any threat of thunderstorms, come visit in the late summer or early fall period, where only brief thundershowers are a concern. These rains are light and so much so that the parks actually sell umbrellas and ponchos to help keep their guests dry. Rain itself doesn’t bring about the closure of the park, although some rides may be closed here and there.

In terms of likely threats, as a visitor your main concern will probably be the heat of the long spring-summer season. When travelling through large amusement parks, wear light coloured clothing to avoid overheating. Hats and sunglasses also protect your face and skin. Apply sunscreen before putting in long walking days and cover up your arms, face, neck and chest if possible.

Stay hydrated with water and avoid soft drinks, tea and coffee since they only dehydrate you further. It’s not uncommon to see someone suffer from fatigue or even heat stroke because of the heat and a lack of water. In addition to taking breaks from walking the parks, you can also cool off by visiting a swimming pool or a water park ride. No wonder Blizzard Beach is so popular in the summer!

 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.

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Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.