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Dalaman History

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image : (c) istock/thinkstock

The Distant Past

The oldest discoveries indicating life in Dalaman date back to 3000 B.C., speaking of Greek immigrants. New settlers began making great strides in agriculture, fishing, and other natural resources. The area was once called the Ahhiyava, and it was influenced by all of its visitors, from the Persians, to the Athenians, to the Helens and the Romans. However, the Lycians were among the first groups to inhabit the land, and were also considered some of the longest dwelling ones. For over 1,600 years this people lived in what is now Dalaman, back when it was called Lycia and eventually Karia, when the Iranians took over.

The Lycians had a rather sketchy record, and were perceived as threats by the Hittities and Egyptians, for their pirating and raiding practices. The fact that no records have surfaced of the ancient civilisation points to the idea that they did not know how to read or write. Oddly enough, some Egyptian records indict Lycia as an ally of the Hittites at some point. However, by the end of the Hittite Empire, Lycia was an independent kingdom. Aside from pre-record mentions, there is not much about Lycia to explain the gap in between the B.C. era and classical Greek times. These gaps, even perceived in the words of the Greeks, further indicate that nothing is known for sure. However, it is suspected the Lycians fought in the Trojan War, though there is no mention of them in literature of the day. Some of the speculation of Lycia’s proto-history involves legends that seem to contradict archaeological findings. For instance, the idea that Lycians came from Crete seems farfetched, given that no evidence exists for this supposition and since they spoke Luwian, which had not reached Crete.

Ottomans later took over the region, and changed the name to Hidivi Abbas Pasa. Beyond the 13th century, wars between the Ottoman Empire and Mentese Bey saw the territory change hands a few times. Turkish settlers came to the land and lasted until 1390. The Ottomans won back control, albeit for a short 12 years, when the Mentese toppled them again. This time 50 years passed with the territory in Mentese’s control. The year 1451 determined for certain who controlled Daman, when the Ottomans won a decisive victory and kept control for over four more centuries. This helped to bring an age of peace and profitability, leading to the nation’s tourist friendly appeal today.

By the 1800s, forestry work and animal life had been preserved and the population beginning the grow. The 20th century saw factories come to Dalaman in the 1940s and onward. Business boomed, eventually culminating in the construction of an airport in 1981. This introduced tourism to the district-town. What tourists and developers saw was a land that was still pure; bustling with wild animals, large forest areas, natural waterfronts and coastal regions and plenty of opportunity to make this a world destination site. In 1998, the Dalaman Airport’s reconstruction made it the third largest in the entire country, and it underwent further renovations in 2002.

One of the most interesting aspects of Turkey is its unknown history. One of the beliefs is that the bed of the Black Sea was one inhabited by civilisation, but was then flooded in prehistoric times by rising sea levels. Mount Ararat is Turkey’s highest plain, measuring over 5,000 metres. It is rumoured to be the landing place of Noah’s Ark according to tradition. Mount Ararat is still accessible, and is part of the mountainous lands of the easternmost part of Turkey.

Turkey has come a long way since 1923, when the remains of the Ottoman Empire organised into a new country. Within 100 years, the country took a secular turn, replacing religious laws with tourist-friendly secular laws. The major turning point was World War I, which saw the Ottoman Turks fall thanks in part to the Arab Revolt, which was fought to create a unified Arab state. By 1918, the Armistice of Mudros put an end to Middle Eastern conflict (at least temporarily) and soon enough the remnants of the Ottomans were divided.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.

Additional resources we recommend

http://www.tripadvisor.com
http://www.lonelyplanet.com
http://www.dalaman.cx/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalaman

 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.

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Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.